Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

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Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby edpav8r » Tue Jan 25, 2011 3:25 am

The following is a general guide to making Wake-on-LAN work over the internet. This will allow you to wake your HTPC/Remote Potato server from a sleep/hibernation state so that you can use the Remote Potato web interface or smartphone client. This isn't simple, but I've tried to break it down into a step-by-step process that you should be able to follow successfully.

Note 1: Wake-on-LAN works only over a hard-wired network (i.e. your computer is physically connected to your router via an ethernet cable). If the computer you wish to wake remotely connects to the internet via Wi-Fi, Wake-on-LAN will not work.

Note 2: If you have already set up the Remote Potato server, you may have already accomplished steps 2 and 4, below. Just double-check that everything is configured correctly.

Note 3: Throughout these instructions, any place I've written that you should type something, do not include the quotes.

OK, let's get started!


  1. PREPARATION
    The first step is to collect some information about your computer.

    • For Windows Vista and Windows 7: Click 'Start', click 'Run...', type "cmd" and click 'OK'. This will open a command window where you'll see something like this:

      Code: Select all
      Microsoft Windows [Version X.X.XXXX]
      Copyright (c) XXXX Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

      C:\Users\Yourname>_


      Type "ipconfig /all" and press 'Enter'. The command window will fill with information about your computer's networking capabilities. Find the section titled "Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection" (use the scroll bar if it has disappeared from the top of the window). Write down the values adjacent to the following items:

      • Physical Address (six pairs of hyphenated numbers/letters).
      • IPv4 Address (usually 192.168.X.X).
      • Subnet Mask (usually 255.255.255.0).
    • For Windows versions before Vista: Click 'Start', click 'Run...', type "winipcfg" and click 'OK'. You should see a window that looks like this:

      Image

      Write down the first three alphanumeric values in this window, then close it.


  2. SET UP DYNAMIC DOMAIN NAME SERVICE (DynDNS)
    Note: Do this step only from the computer you want to wake remotely, or another computer on the same local network (connected to the same router, and with the same outside IP address).

    Click this link: http://www.dyndns.com/. At the bottom left corner you'll see a box titled "Free Domain Name". Enter a hostname for your computer in the text window (you can use anything you like, but use only letters and numbers). Click the dropdown menu and change the parent domain to 'dyndns.org' (this is important; many routers are pre-configured for Dynamic DNS and their only option is the dyndns.org domain). Click 'Add'.

    If you entered an available hostname, the next screen you see will be a shopping cart.

    If the hostname you entered is already taken, you'll see a screen titled "Add New Hostname". Enter a different hostname, leave everything else the same, scroll to the bottom and click 'Add To Cart'. If this hostname is available, you should now be at the shopping cart page.

    On the shopping cart page, fill in a username and password (write them down!), enter a valid email address, solve the Captcha, uncheck the box next to "DynDNS.com Newsletter", check the box next to "I agree with the..." and click "Create Account".

    Follow the instructions on the next screen to activate your DynDNS account. Once your account is active, you can close all DynDNS windows/tabs.


  3. CONFIGURE YOUR BIOS AND NETWORK ADAPTER
    1. Reboot your computer and press the appropriate key during the Power-On Self Test to enter the BIOS Setup. Look through the various screens for anything related to Wake-on-LAN and be sure it's enabled. Save changes and exit. Your computer will reboot again.

    2. Open the Windows Device Manager. You can get there through the Control Panel, or directly like this:

      • Windows Vista and Windows 7: Click 'Start', click 'Run...', type "devmgmt.msc" and click 'OK'.

      • Windows versions before Vista: Click 'Start', click 'Run...', type "C:\WINDOWS\CONTROL.EXE Sysdm.cpl, System,1" and click 'OK'.

      Scroll down to find 'Network adapters' and click the sideways triangle to expand the list of devices. You may see several devices (i.e. Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, etc.). Find your LAN adapter, right-click on it, and on the context menu, click 'Properties'.

      On the 'Advanced' tab, look carefully through the list of properties and make sure that anything related to Wake-on-LAN is enabled. You may see properties like 'Shutdown Wake-on-LAN', 'Wake on Magic Packet', 'Wake on Pattern Match', or others. Enable them all.

      On the 'Power Management' tab, check all three boxes and click 'OK'.


  4. CONFIGURE YOUR ROUTER FOR PORT FORWARDING
    Every router is different, so I can't give you specific instructions for your particular model. However, the nice folks at PortForward.com have assembled a catalog of instructions for most consumer routers. Click this link: http://portforward.com/.

    Scroll down the page and find your router model; click its link. On the next page, in the upper right corner, click 'Click here to skip this advertisement...". Part way down the next page you should see a single line with the words 'Default Guide' as a link; click it.

    On the next page, follow the instructions for your router to turn on port forwarding. You'll need the IP address that you wrote down in Step 1, above.

    Note: IGNORE the first paragraph about Static IP Address, and IGNORE the step that says 'Do not skip this step!'. [In most cases, a static IP address costs extra from your Internet Service Provider. We're using free Dynamic DNS to avoid this charge.]

    When you're done, you should have forwarded port 9080 for TCP traffic, and port 9081 for TCP and UDP traffic. These are the settings required for the Remote Potato server, and they'll also work for Wake-on-LAN.


  5. CONFIGURE YOUR ROUTER OR COMPUTER TO UPDATE DynDNS
    As the title of this step suggests, there's more than one way to keep the DynDNS server aware of your current outside IP address. The ideal method is for your router to do it, because it doesn't require your computer to be running when the IP address changes; the router simply reports the change to DynDNS on its own. Unfortunately many routers do a poor job, even if they have the capability built in. Try option 'a' first, in case your router is one that works. If it doesn't, try option 'b', below.

    1. Using the same local IP address that you used in Step 4, open your router's setup screen again. Look for a setting titled 'Dynamic DNS', 'DynDNS', 'DDNS' or similar. On that setup screen, enter the required information about your DynDNS account and apply the changes. This should automatically keep the DynDNS system updated whenever your outside IP address changes. Your router may have a built-in help link that explains what to put in its particular setup screen.

    2. If your router doesn't have this capability, or you can't make it work, you can run a program on your computer that will accomplish the same thing. A download link and installation instructions for the DynDNS updater are located here: http://www.dyndns.com/support/clients/.

      You may need to set up an event in Windows Task Scheduler that will wake up the computer at least once per day so that the updater can check and report any IP address change.

      For Microsoft's instructions on setting up Task Scheduler, click this link: http://support.microsoft.com/search/default.aspx?query=task+scheduler. On the left side of the page, click on your version of Windows. The instructions you want should be the first or second search result.


  6. TEST THE SETUP
    Note: You may not be able to test this setup from a computer on the same local network as your Remote Potato server. Then again, you might get lucky. The best way to test it is from an internet connection with a different outside IP address. If you have a smartphone that you use to access Remote Potato, that's the best vehicle for this test. Just be sure you turn OFF your smartphone's Wi-Fi connection; you want it to use the cellular data network so that the Wake-on-LAN request comes from a different IP address. If you don't have a smartphone, use a computer at work, at a neighbor's house, or call a friend and talk them through the following steps.

    Put your Remote Potato server to sleep. Look at the back of the computer, specifically the LAN adapter (the card that the ethernet cable from your router plugs into). You should see a light (usually green or yellow) that's either on steady or blinking intermittently. If you see the light, then your LAN adapter is still powered and communicating with your router. If there's no light, then your LAN adapter is powered off and there's no point going any further. Look through the Device Manager and BIOS settings again (Step 3) to be sure you didn't miss anything. Check the manufacturer's website for your LAN adapter; there may be an updated driver that fixes or adds Wake-on-LAN capability. Once you've got a light with the computer sleeping, continue below.

    From a computer or smartphone on a different outside IP address, click this link: http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx. On the page that appears, make the following entries:

    • Your Network Cards Mac Address: ['Physical Address' or 'MAC Address' from Step 1, above]
    • Any Computers IP Number or FQDN: ['hostname.dyndns.org' from Step 2, above]
    • Your Subnet Mask: ['Subnet Mask' address from Step 1, above]
    • Any Port Number: 9081

    Click the 'WAKE ON LAN' button. The Depicus website will go to the DynDNS server, which will redirect to your IP address. When your router receives the "Magic Packet" on port 9081, it will forward the packet to your LAN adapter's MAC address. If everything is configured correctly, your computer should wake up!

    If it tests correctly, you can create a bookmark in your smartphone's browser that will send the "Magic Packet" without having to type in all the numbers. It looks like this:

    Code: Select all
    http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx?m= [MAC ADDRESS] &i= [hostname.dyndns.org] &s= [SUBNET MASK] &p=9081


    Make the following replacements, delete the spaces, and save the link as a bookmark:

    • [MAC ADDRESS] = 'Physical Address' or 'MAC Address' from Step 1, above.
    • [hostname.dyndns.org] = Address from Step 2, above.
    • [SUBNET MASK] = 'Subnet Mask' address from Step 1, above.

    For example, your link might look like this:

    Code: Select all
    http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx?m=431437BDA600&i=johndoe.dyndns.org&s=255.255.255.0&p=9081

Enjoy!
edpav8r
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby PeeWee » Tue Jan 25, 2011 7:50 am

Hi Edpav8r,

Great guide, many thanks for the effort you've put in. Below, i have outlined a few steps which could help others getting stuck for whatever reason.

I would swap step 2 and 3: first setup your Bios and network card, then check locally if WOL works, then proceed with Dyndns..

Extra step.
Before setting up WOL via Internet, but after setting up Bios & networkcard, it might be a good idea to check first wether WOL is working on the target pc or not without bringing the internet into the equation. A few steps & utilities are helpfull in this process.

Try sending a WOL/Magic packet from another PC inside your home network (if you have any). This will ensure WOL is working before proceeding to the Dyndns steps. You can do this by going to http://wakeonlan.me/ from another pc in your LAN (or your smartphone connected to your Wifi router). Type in the IP address and MAC address obtained in step one and click "Wake up my pc!". You're target pc should wake up.

If that doesn't work, you can startup your target pc and install Depicus Wake on Lan Monitor to make some checks. This utility should show WOL packets arriving at the pc when sent from another pc. If packets arrive, you know that the packets are succesfully sent from the other computer, and successfully received by the PC. If the receiving PC still doens't wake up when packets are sent, check the Bios and networkcard settings again.

Extra step.
If you have determinded that Wol works locally, but you can't get it to work via Dyndns via the Internet, go to http://wakeonlan.me/ and type in the MAC address found in step 1. For the IP address, do not use the IP address from step 1, but use the external IP address of your router. You can determine this IP address by going to http://whatsmyip.org and writing down the IP address shown. If WOLling your pc works this way, this tells you that you have setup portforwarding in your router successfully.

Extra check
There is still a good chance WOL from the internet stil;l doesn't work after these checks. As a last resort, change the Port Forwarding address used in the Router Port Forward in a way that the last number reads 255. I.e. if your IP adress of the PC found in step 1 is 192.168.0.1, setup your router to forward port 9081 to 192.168.0.255. This tells the router to forward packets received on port 9081 to ALL pc's in the 192.168.0.1-192.168.0.255 range. Many times this is neccessary because a pc that is sleeping has no IP address (!), so a forwarding rule to a specific IP addres is of no use. To complicate things, routers may prevent you from entering an IP address ending in .255. In which case there not much more you can do than flashing your router with custom firmware like DDWRT like i did. If that is no problem for you, then you probably didn't need this guide in the first place :-)
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby edpav8r » Mon Jan 31, 2011 2:54 am

PeeWee,

Great tips, and a nice addition to the procedure. Thanks for the assist.

-E
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby Carlos » Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:34 pm

Stickied. Thanks for the great info. :D

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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby ianc500 » Fri Sep 16, 2011 3:17 pm

Hi
Great guide worked first time.

Although I tried sending a magic packet after more than about 5mins into sleep and no power up?!
I made sure hibernation is off also.

Any ideas?
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby PeeWee » Sat Sep 17, 2011 7:08 pm

ianc500 wrote:Hi
Great guide worked first time.

Although I tried sending a magic packet after more than about 5mins into sleep and no power up?!
I made sure hibernation is off also.

Any ideas?



Hi Ian, i'm not sure what you mean. Does WOL work the first time, but not after the PC has gone to sleep for 5 minutes? For the record: sending magic packets does not prevent a pc going to sleep, it's not like everytime a magic packet is received, a countdown timer is reset or something. A magic packet just wakes up a pc when its in sleep.
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby ianc500 » Sun Sep 18, 2011 1:22 am

Hi PeeWee

I'm sending my pc to sleep, I wait 1-2mins send a magic packet, it wakes up.
But if I test again, by leaving it in sleep longer than a few mins and try sending a magic packet I get no respons.

Appologies, might not have been clear the first time around.

Ian
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby ianc500 » Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:48 am

Success!
I've removed my PowerLine adapter and installed a direct Ethernet cable to my router from my HTPC. I've only recently been able to take my floor boards up to do it!

Obviously not only wireless adapters have issues.

Ian
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby dgre057 » Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:39 pm

WoL is really useful with Remote Potato. I have a an app on my phone called iWake that works really well.
I do have a strange problem though. When I'm streaming video's to my phone from my computer at home, my computer still goes to sleep. It works fine when I'm at home and just streaming through the home network, but when streaming over the internet, my computer doesn't seem to know I'm watching.

Any idea how to change this? Thanks!
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Re: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) Setup Tutorial

Postby Aaronac8 » Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:43 am

I have tomato firmware on my router and am able to WOL through the firmwares tools menu, but
When my pc is asleep the remote potato server does not wake my pc and connect to it; I need to remotely access my routers tools menu to WOL then open remote potato. How do I have remote potato WOL AND open its server? Any help is greatly appreciated!
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